Mathematics

In line with the curricula of many high performing jurisdictions, the National curriculum emphasises the importance of all pupils mastering the content taught each year and discourages the acceleration of pupils into content from subsequent years.

The current National Curriculum document says:

‘The expectation is that the majority of pupils will move through the programmes of study at broadly the same pace. However, decisions about when to progress should always be based on the security of pupils’ understanding and their readiness to progress to the next stage. Pupils who grasp concepts rapidly should be challenged through being offered rich and sophisticated problems before any acceleration through new content. Those who are not sufficiently fluent with earlier material should consolidate their understanding, including through additional practice, before moving on.’ (National curriculum page 3).

Progress in mathematics learning each year should be assessed according to the extent to which pupils are gaining a deep understanding of the content taught for that year, resulting in sustainable knowledge and skills. Key measures of this are the abilities to reason mathematically and to solve increasingly complex problems, doing so with fluency, as described in the aims of the National curriculum:

‘The national curriculum for mathematics aims to ensure that all pupils:

• become fluent in the fundamentals of mathematics, including through varied and frequent practice with increasingly complex problems over time, so that pupils develop conceptual understanding and the ability to recall and apply knowledge rapidly and accurately

• reason mathematically by following a line of enquiry, conjecturing relationships and generalisations, and developing an argument, justification or proof using mathematical language.

• can solve problems by applying their mathematics to a variety of routine and non-routine problems with increasing sophistication, including breaking down problems into a series of simpler steps and persevering in seeking solutions.’ (National curriculum page 3)

Assessment arrangements must complement the curriculum and so need to mirror these principles and offer a structure for assessing pupils’ progress in developing mastery of the content laid out for each year.

What do we mean by mastery?

The essential idea behind mastery is that all children need a deep understanding of the mathematics they are learning so that:

• future mathematical learning is built on solid foundations which do not need to be re-taught;

• there is no need for separate catch-up programmes due to some children falling behind.

• children who, under other teaching approaches, can often fall a long way behind, are better able to keep up with their peers, so that gaps in attainment are narrowed whilst the attainment of all is raised.

There are generally four ways in which the term mastery is being used in the current debate about raising standards in mathematics:

1. A mastery approach: a set of principles and beliefs. This includes a belief that all pupils are capable of understanding and doing mathematics, given sufficient time. Pupils are neither ‘born with the maths gene’ nor ‘just no good at maths’. With good teaching, appropriate resources, effort and a ‘can do’ attitude all children can achieve in and enjoy mathematics.

2. A mastery curriculum: one set of mathematical concepts and big ideas for all. All pupils need access to these concepts and ideas and to the rich connections between them. There is no such thing as ‘special needs mathematics’ or ‘gifted and talented mathematics’. Mathematics is mathematics and the key ideas and building blocks are important for everyone.

3.Teaching for mastery: a set of pedagogic practices that keep the class working together on the same topic, whilst at the same time addressing the need for all pupils to master the curriculum and for some to gain greater depth of proficiency and understanding. Challenge is provided by going deeper rather than accelerating into new mathematical content. Teaching is focused, rigorous and thorough, to ensure that learning is sufficiently embedded and sustainable over time. Long term gaps in learning are prevented through speedy teacher intervention. More time is spent on teaching topics to allow for the development of depth and sufficient practice to embed learning. Carefully crafted lesson design provides a scaffolded, conceptual journey through the mathematics, engaging pupils in reasoning and the development of mathematical thinking.

4. Achieving mastery of particular topics and areas of mathematics. Mastery is not just being able to memorise key facts and procedures and answer test questions accurately and quickly. It involves knowing ‘why’ as well as knowing ‘that’ and knowing ‘how’. It means being able to use one’s knowledge appropriately, flexibly and creatively and to apply it in new and unfamiliar situations.

Mastery of mathematics is not a fixed state but a continuum. At each stage of learning, pupils should acquire and demonstrate sufficient grasp of the mathematics relevant to their year group, so that their learning is sustainable over time and can be built upon in subsequent years. This requires development of depth through looking at concepts in detail using a variety of representations and contexts and committing key facts, such as number bonds and times tables, to memory.

Mastery of facts, procedures and concepts needs time: time to explore the concept in detail and time to allow for sufficient practice to develop fluency.Helen Drury asserts in ‘Mastering Mathematics’ (Oxford University Press, 2014, page 9) that: ‘A mathematical concept or skill has been mastered when, through exploration, clarification, practice and application over time, a person can represent it in multiple ways, has the mathematical language to be able to communicate related ideas, and can think mathematically with the concept so that they can independently apply it to a totally new problem in an unfamiliar situation.’

Practice is most effective when it is intelligent practice, i.e. where the teacher is advised to avoid mechanical repetition and to create an appropriate path for practising the thinking process with increasing creativity. (Gu 2004)

Mastery of the curriculum requires that all pupils:

• use mathematical concepts, facts and procedures appropriately, flexibly and fluently;

• recall key number facts with speed and accuracy and use them to calculate and work out unknown facts;

• have sufficient depth of knowledge and understanding to reason and explain mathematical concepts and procedures and use them to solve a variety of problems.

A useful checklist for what to look out for when assessing a pupil’s understanding might be:

A pupil really understands a mathematical concept, idea or technique if he or she can:

• describe it in his or her own words;

• represent it in a variety of ways (e.g. using concrete materials, pictures and symbols – the CPA approach)

• explain it to someone else;

• make up his or her own examples (and nonexamples) of it;

• see connections between it and other facts or ideas;

• recognise it in new situations and contexts;

• make use of it in various ways, including in new situations.

Mathletics Information

Maths Calculation Policy

Mathletics guide – Parents

Mathletics guide – Children

Key instant recall facts

Maths Workshop – Final

Maths Key Objectives