Curriculum Subjects

Art & Design

The national curriculum for art and design aims to ensure that all pupils produce creative work, exploring their ideas and recording their experiences; become proficient in drawing, painting, sculpture and other art, craft and design techniques; evaluate and analyse creative works using the language of art, craft and design; develop the creative, technical and practical expertise needed to perform everyday tasks confidently and to participate successfully in an increasingly technological world; know about great artists, craft makers and designers, and understand the historical and cultural development of their art forms.

Purpose of study: Art, craft and design embody some of the highest forms of human creativity. A high-quality art and design education should engage, inspire and challenge pupils, equipping them with the knowledge and skills to experiment, invent and create their own works of art, craft and design. As pupils progress, they should be able to think critically and develop a more rigorous understanding of art and design. They should also know how art and design both reflect and shape our history, and contribute to the culture, creativity and wealth of our nation.

Aims: The national curriculum for art and design aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • produce creative work, exploring their ideas and recording their experiences
  • become proficient in drawing, painting, sculpture and other art, craft and design techniques
  • evaluate and analyse creative works using the language of art, craft and design
  • know about great artists, craft makers and designers, and understand the historical and cultural development of their art forms.

Attainment targets: By the end of each key stage, pupils are expected to know, apply and understand the matters, skills and processes specified in the relevant programme of study.

Subject content Key stage 1: Pupils should be taught:

  • to use a range of materials creatively to design and make products
  • to use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination
  • to develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space
  • about the work of a range of artists, craft makers and designers, describing the differences and similarities between different practices and disciplines, and making links to their own work.

Key stage 2: Pupils should be taught to develop their techniques, including their control and their use of materials, with creativity, experimentation and an increasing awareness of different kinds of art, craft and design. Pupils should be taught:

  • to create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas
  • to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials (e.g. pencil, charcoal, paint, clay)
  • about great artists, architects and designers in history.

Computing

The use of ICT is promoted in all subject areas and children use computers to enhance and compliment much of their work in school. They are encouraged to use the equipment properly, carefully and safely. Although every classroom has networked computer stations where children experience a variety of curriculum support programmes, our wireless laptops ensure individual experiences and progress through whole class focused activities.

There are Smartboards in every classroom. The school has an Internet access policy and Internet access is managed the Bishop Wilkinson Catholic Education Trust IT Team to ensure safety for our children. E-Safety Information for Parents E-Safety Information for Children

Purpose of study: A high-quality computing education equips pupils to use computational thinking and creativity to understand and change the world. Computing has deep links with mathematics, science and design and technology, and provides insights into both natural and artificial systems. The core of computing is computer science, in which pupils are taught the principles of information and computation, how digital systems work and how to put this knowledge to use through programming. Building on this knowledge and understanding, pupils are equipped to use information technology to create programs, systems and a range of content. Computing also ensures that pupils become digitally literate – able to use, and express themselves and develop their ideas through, information and communication technology – at a level suitable for the future workplace and as active participants in a digital world.

Aims: The national curriculum for computing aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • can understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation,
  • can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems,
  • can evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems,
  • are responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology.

Key Stage 1: Pupils will be taught to:

  • understand what algorithms are, how they are implemented as programs on digital devices, and that programs execute by following precise and unambiguous instructions,
  • create and debug simple programs,
  • use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs,
  • use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content,
  • recognise common uses of information technology beyond school,
  • use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online technologies.

Key Stage 2: Pupils will be taught to:

  • design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts,
  • use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output,
  • use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and to detect and correct errors in algorithms and programs,
  • understand computer networks, including the internet; how they can provide multiple services, such as the World Wide Web, and the opportunities they offer for communication and collaboration,
  • use search technologies effectively, appreciate how results are selected and ranked, and be discerning in evaluating digital content,
  • select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to design and create a range of programs, systems and content that accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data and information,
  • use technology safely, respectfully and responsibly; recognise acceptable/unacceptable behaviour; identify a range of ways to report concerns about content and contact.

Design & Technology

Purpose of study: Design and technology is an inspiring, rigorous and practical subject. Using creativity and imagination, pupils design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts, considering their own and others’ needs, wants and values. They acquire a broad range of subject knowledge and draw on disciplines such as mathematics, science, engineering, computing and art. Pupils learn how to take risks, becoming resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable citizens. Through the evaluation of past and present design and technology, they develop a critical understanding of its impact on daily life and the wider world. High-quality design and technology education makes an essential contribution to the creativity, culture, wealth and well-being of the nation.

Aims: The national curriculum for design and technology aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • develop the creative, technical and practical expertise needed to perform everyday tasks confidently and to participate successfully in an increasingly technological world.
  • build and apply a repertoire of knowledge, understanding and skills in order to design and make high-quality prototypes and products for a wide range of users.
  • critique, evaluate and test their ideas and products and the work of others.
  • understand and apply the principles of nutrition and learn how to cook.

Key Stage 1: Pupils will be taught to:

When designing and making, pupils will be taught to: Design

  • Design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria.
  • Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology.

Make

  • Select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing].
  • select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their characteristics.

Evaluate

  • Explore and evaluate a range of existing products.
  • Evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria.

Technical knowledge

  • Build structures, exploring how they can be made stronger, stiffer and more stable.
  • Explore and use mechanisms [for example, levers, sliders, wheels and axles], in their products.

Cooking and nutrition

  • Use the basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes.
  • Understand where food comes from.

Key Stage 2: Pupils will be taught to:

When designing and making, pupils will be taught to: Design

  • use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups.
  • generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design.

Make

  • select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing], accurately.
  • select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities.

Evaluate

  • investigate and analyse a range of existing products.
  • evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work.
  • understand how key events and individuals in design and technology have helped shape the world.

Technical knowledge

  • apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce more complex structures.
  • understand and use mechanical systems in their products [for example, gears, pulleys, cams, levers and linkages].
  • understand and use electrical systems in their products [for example, series circuits incorporating switches, bulbs, buzzers and motors].
  • apply their understanding of computing to program, monitor and control their products.

Cooking and nutrition

  • understand and apply the principles of a healthy and varied diet
  • prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques.
  • understand seasonality, and know where and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed.

French (MFL)

At Sacred Heart we are keen to promote the study of a Modern Foreign Language (MFL) because of its increasing importance in the modern world. We want to embed language learning into our curriculum. This has been recognised in the National Curriculum where there is the statutory commitment to give every child between the ages of 7 and 11 the opportunity to learn a new language. Enriching the curriculum and releasing children’s creative energy through sport drama, music and languages reinforces their understanding of the basics and helps them enjoy a broader, more balanced curriculum. The experience of learning and using a foreign language makes its unique contribution to the whole curriculum by taking children out of the familiar environment which is pervaded by English and allowing them to explore the life-style and culture of another land through the medium of its language. This in turn provides a satisfying, enjoyable and intellectually challenging experience for children in coping with a different linguistic medium.

Aims: In French, pupils will learn to:

  • read fluently
  • write imaginatively
  • speak confidently
  • understand the culture of the countries in which the language is spoken

We aim to ensure that pupils:

  • understand and respond to spoken and written language from a variety of authentic sources.
  • speak with increasing confidence, fluency and spontaneity, finding ways of communicating what they want to say, including through discussion and asking questions, and continually improving the accuracy of their pronunciation and intonation.
  • can write at varying length, for different purposes and audiences, using the variety of grammatical structures that they have learnt.
  • discover and develop an appreciation of a range of writing in the language studied.

Subject Content: In Early Years and Key Stage 1 settings, it is suggested that MFL activities such as songs, classroom phrases, games become part of classroom practice. In Key Stage 2 teaching and learning follows the coverage grid set out in the progression of skills document. During this first year of French implementation, all Key Stage 2 classes will follow the same units, with progression becoming evident in subsequent years. Creativity in using the lesson plans is encouraged to suit the year group being taught.

Geography

In geography children are introduced to the local area as well as extending their factual knowledge. A wide range of materials are used including maps, photographs, written accounts and other sources. We encourage children to appreciate and protect the environment with the starting point being our school. A high-quality geography education should inspire in pupils a curiosity and fascination about the world and its people that will remain with them for the rest of their lives. Teaching should equip pupils with knowledge about diverse places, people, resources and natural and human environments, together with a deep understanding of the Earth’s key physical and human processes. As pupils progress, their growing knowledge about the world should help them to deepen their understanding of the interaction between physical and human processes, and of the formation and use of landscapes and environments. Geographical knowledge, understanding and skills provide the frameworks and approaches that explain how the Earth’s features at different scales are shaped, interconnected and change over time

Aims The national curriculum for geography aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • develop contextual knowledge of the location of globally significant places – both terrestrial and marine – including their defining physical and human characteristics and how these provide a geographical context for understanding the actions of processes.
  • understand the processes that give rise to key physical and human geographical features of the world, how these are interdependent and how they bring about spatial variation and change over time.
  • are competent in the geographical skills needed to:
  • collect, analyse and communicate with a range of data gathered through experiences of fieldwork that deepen their understanding of geographical processes.
  • interpret a range of sources of geographical information, including maps, diagrams, globes, aerial photographs and Geographical Information Systems (GIS).
  • communicate geographical information in a variety of ways, including through maps, numerical and quantitative skills and writing at length.

Attainment targets: By the end of each key stage, pupils are expected to know, apply and understand the matters, skills and processes specified in the relevant programme of study.

Key Stage 1: Pupils will be taught to:

Pupils should develop knowledge about the world, the United Kingdom and their locality. They should understand basic subject-specific vocabulary relating to human and physical geography and begin to use geographical skills, including first-hand observation, to enhance their locational awareness. Pupils should be taught to: Locational knowledge

  • name and locate the world’s seven continents and five oceans.
  • name, locate and identify characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas.

Place knowledge

  • understand geographical similarities and differences through studying the human and physical geography of a small area of the United Kingdom, and of a small area in a contrasting non-European country.
  • Human and physical geography.
  • identify seasonal and daily weather patterns in the United Kingdom and the location of hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the Equator and the North and South Poles.
  • use basic geographical vocabulary to refer to:
  • key physical features, including: beach, cliff, coast, forest, hill, mountain, sea, ocean, river, soil, valley, vegetation, season and weather.
  • key human features, including: city, town, village, factory, farm, house, office, port, harbour and shop.

Geographical skills and fieldwork

  • use world maps, atlases and globes to identify the United Kingdom and its countries, as well as the countries, continents and oceans studied at this key stage.
  • use simple compass directions (North, South, East and West) and locational and directional language [for example, near and far; left and right], to describe the location of features and routes on a map.
  • use aerial photographs and plan perspectives to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical features; devise a simple map; and use and construct basic symbols in a key.
  • use simple fieldwork and observational skills to study the geography of their school and its grounds and the key human and physical features of its surrounding environment.

Key Stage 2: Pupils will be taught to:

Pupils should extend their knowledge and understanding beyond the local area to include the United Kingdom and Europe, North and South America. This will include the location and characteristics of a range of the world’s most significant human and physical features. They should develop their use of geographical knowledge, understanding and skills to enhance their locational and place knowledge. Pupils should be taught to: Locational knowledge

  • locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe (including the location of Russia) and North and South America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities.
  • name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), and land-use patterns; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time.
  • identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich Meridian and time zones (including day and night).

Place knowledge

  • understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the United Kingdom, a region in a European country, and a region within North or South America.

Human and physical geography

  • describe and understand key aspects of:
  • physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle.
  • human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water

Geographical skills and fieldwork

  • use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied.
  • use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world.
  • use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

History

In history we introduce children to historical personalities and events through stories, poetry, pictures and TV, at local, national and world levels. We use the children’s own lives and environment to make them aware of the passage of time. Children are encouraged to use documentary evidence to enhance their understanding and develop their historical skills. Parents and the local community play a very important part in the development of resources and artefacts for this area of work. We encourage all children to take part in field trips related to their topics. A high-quality history education will help pupils gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world. It should inspire pupils’ curiosity to know more about the past. Teaching should equip pupils to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement. History helps pupils to understand the complexity of people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity and the challenges of their time.

Attainment Targets: By the end of each key stage, pupils are expected to know, apply and understand the matters, skills and processes specified in the relevant programme of study.

Aims: The national curriculum for history aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day: how people’s lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world.
  • know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; characteristic features of past non-European societies; achievements and follies of mankind.
  • gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’, ‘civilisation’, ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry’.
  • understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically-valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses.
  • understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed.
  • gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales.

Key Stage 1: Pupils will be taught to:

Pupils should develop an awareness of the past, using common words and phrases relating to the passing of time. They should know where the people and events they study fit within a chronological framework and identify similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods. They should use a wide vocabulary of everyday historical terms. They should ask and answer questions, choosing and using parts of stories and other sources to show that they know and understand key features of events. They should understand some of the ways in which we find out about the past and identify different ways in which it is represented. Pupils should be taught about:

  • changes within living memory. Where appropriate, these should be used to reveal aspects of change in national life.
  • events beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally [for example, the Great Fire of London, the first aeroplane flight or events commemorated through festivals or anniversaries].
  • the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements. Some should be used to compare aspects of life in different periods [for example, Elizabeth I and Queen Victoria, Christopher Columbus and Neil Armstrong, William Caxton and Tim Berners-Lee, Pieter Bruegel the Elder and LS Lowry, Rosa Parks and Emily Davison, Mary Seacole and/or Florence Nightingale and Edith Cavell].
  • significant historical events, people and places in their own locality.

Key Stage 2: Pupils will be taught to:

Pupils should continue to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history, establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study. They should note connections, contrasts and trends over time and develop the appropriate use of historical terms. They should regularly address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance. They should construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information. They should understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources. Pupils should be taught about:

  • changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age.
  • the Roman Empire and its impact on Britain.
  • Britain’s settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots.
  • the Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the Kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor.
  • a local history study.
  • a study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066.

the achievements of the earliest civilizations – an overview of where and when the first civilizations appeared and a depth study of one of the following: Ancient Sumer; The Indus Valley; Ancient Egypt; The Shang Dynasty of Ancient China.

  • Ancient Greece – a study of Greek life and achievements and their influence on the western world.
  • a non-European society that provides contrasts with British history – one study chosen from: early Islamic civilization, including a study of Baghdad c. AD 900; Mayan civilization c. AD 900; Benin (West Africa) c. AD 900-1300.

Literacy

At Sacred Heart Catholic Primary School, we believe that literacy and communication are key life skills and that it is our role, through the English curriculum, to help children develop the skills and knowledge that will enable them to communicate effectively and creatively with the world at large, through spoken and written language. Through a love of reading that is embedded within our school, we strive to help children to enjoy and appreciate literature and its rich variety.

Aims and Objectives: As a school, we aim to promote high standards of language and literacy by equipping children with a strong command of the spoken and written word, and to develop their love of literature through widespread reading both across the curriculum and at home. As a school, we aim to ensure that all pupils:

  • read easily, fluently and with good understanding
  • develop the habit of reading widely and often, for both pleasure and information
  • acquire a wide vocabulary, an understanding of grammar and knowledge of linguistic conventions for reading, writing and spoken language
  • appreciate our rich and varied literary heritage
  • write clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting their language and style in and for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences
  • use discussion in order to learn; they should be able to elaborate and explain clearly their understanding and ideas
  • are competent in the arts of speaking and listening, making formal presentations, demonstrating to others and participating in debate.

In all Key Stages a range of genres are taught, including fiction, non-fiction and poetry. Each unit is an integrated programme of speaking and listening, reading and writing. The children set targets at the beginning of each unit and are involved in reviewing the progress that has been made at regular intervals. During lessons the children are encouraged to explore text through role play, freeze framing, hot-seating and many other speaking and listening activities which allow children to develop their ability to communicate as well as build on their own self confidence. English is taught within an integrated programme of speaking and listening, guided reading and writing. The children’s abilities in English are developed across the curriculum. They are taught to communicate and express themselves clearly and effectively in speech and writing and great emphasis is placed on the ability to listen and understand. The children experience a wide variety of reading material at appropriate levels of complexity and interest so that they become competent, enthusiastic and fluent readers. Reading development is seen as a partnership between home and school and children are encouraged to choose books to take home to read to their parents. The school has fully adopted the New Framework for Literacy. Guided reading takes place on a daily basis.

Reading schemes: Pupils read through a set of book banded books. Each colour in the book band is a different level. We provide a diet and range of books at different levels within a book band. The pupils know which book band they are working at and recognise the book band that they are working towards.

Opportunities for reading: Pupils also read regularly in other areas of the curriculum and in other parts of the school day through:

  • Guided Reading – Teachers work with small groups of pupils to teach specific and targeted reading skills in a book that is sufficiently challenging.
  • Reading Across the Curriculum – Pupils read a range of books linked to other areas of their learning and look at texts in more detail during their literacy ‘hook of a book’
  • Story Time – In Key Stage One, books are read to pupils for them to hear good examples of reading aloud and to develop an enthusiasm for reading books themselves. Class books are shared with pupils, where they read along with the teacher.

Key Stage One Reading Schemes: As a school we use Oxford Reading Tree, Sound Start, Project X and Pearson’s as reading schemes. We encourage children to read at home both to and with parents not just from the schemes but a variety of literature.

Mathematics

In line with the curricula of many high performing jurisdictions, the National curriculum emphasises the importance of all pupils mastering the content taught each year and discourages the acceleration of pupils into content from subsequent years. The current National Curriculum document says: The expectation is that the majority of pupils will move through the programmes of study at broadly the same pace. However, decisions about when to progress should always be based on the security of pupils’ understanding and their readiness to progress to the next stage. Pupils who grasp concepts rapidly should be challenged through being offered rich and sophisticated problems before any acceleration through new content. Those who are not sufficiently fluent with earlier material should consolidate their understanding, including through additional practice, before moving on.’ (National Curriculum, page 3). Progress in mathematics learning each year should be assessed according to the extent to which pupils are gaining a deep understanding of the content taught for that year, resulting in sustainable knowledge and skills. Key measures of this are the abilities to reason mathematically and to solve increasingly complex problems, doing so with fluency, as described in the aims of the National curriculum.

The national curriculum for mathematics aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • become fluent in the fundamentals of mathematics, including through varied and frequent practice with increasingly complex problems over time, so that pupils develop conceptual understanding and the ability to recall and apply knowledge rapidly and accurately
  • reason mathematically by following a line of enquiry, conjecturing relationships and generalisations, and developing an argument, justification or proof using mathematical language.
  • can solve problems by applying their mathematics to a variety of routine and non-routine problems with increasing sophistication, including breaking down problems into a series of simpler steps and persevering in seeking solutions.’ (National curriculum page 3)

Assessment arrangements must complement the curriculum and so need to mirror these principles and offer a structure for assessing pupils’ progress in developing mastery of the content laid out for each year.

What do we mean by Mastery?

The essential idea behind mastery is that all children need a deep understanding of the mathematics they are learning so that:

  • future mathematical learning is built on solid foundations which do not need to be re-taught;
  • there is no need for separate catch-up programmes due to some children falling behind.
  • children who, under other teaching approaches, can often fall a long way behind, are better able to keep up with their peers, so that gaps in attainment are narrowed whilst the attainment of all is raised.

There are generally four ways in which the term mastery is being used in the current debate about raising standards in mathematics:

  • A mastery approach: a set of principles and beliefs. This includes a belief that all pupils are capable of understanding and doing mathematics, given sufficient time. Pupils are neither ‘born with the maths gene’ nor ‘just no good at maths’. With good teaching, appropriate resources, effort and a ‘can do’ attitude all children can achieve in and enjoy mathematics.
  • A mastery curriculum: one set of mathematical concepts and big ideas for all. All pupils need access to these concepts and ideas and to the rich connections between them. There is no such thing as ‘special needs mathematics’ or ‘gifted and talented mathematics’. Mathematics is mathematics and the key ideas and building blocks are important for everyone.
  • Teaching for mastery: a set of pedagogic practices that keep the class working together on the same topic, whilst at the same time addressing the need for all pupils to master the curriculum and for some to gain greater depth of proficiency and understanding. Challenge is provided by going deeper rather than accelerating into new mathematical content. Teaching is focused, rigorous and thorough, to ensure that learning is sufficiently embedded and sustainable over time. Long term gaps in learning are prevented through speedy teacher intervention. More time is spent on teaching topics to allow for the development of depth and sufficient practice to embed learning. Carefully crafted lesson design provides a scaffolded, conceptual journey through the mathematics, engaging pupils in reasoning and the development of mathematical thinking.
  • Achieving mastery of particular topics and areas of mathematics. Mastery is not just being able to memorise key facts and procedures and answer test questions accurately and quickly. It involves knowing ‘why’ as well as knowing ‘that’ and knowing ‘how’. It means being able to use one’s knowledge appropriately, flexibly and creatively and to apply it in new and unfamiliar situations.

Mastery of mathematics is not a fixed state but a continuum. At each stage of learning, pupils should acquire and demonstrate sufficient grasp of the mathematics relevant to their year group, so that their learning is sustainable over time and can be built upon in subsequent years. This requires development of depth through looking at concepts in detail using a variety of representations and contexts and committing key facts, such as number bonds and times tables, to memory. Mastery of facts, procedures and concepts needs time: time to explore the concept in detail and time to allow for sufficient practice to develop fluency.Helen Drury asserts in ‘Mastering Mathematics’ (Oxford University Press, 2014, page 9) that: ‘A mathematical concept or skill has been mastered when, through exploration, clarification, practice and application over time, a person can represent it in multiple ways, has the mathematical language to be able to communicate related ideas, and can think mathematically with the concept so that they can independently apply it to a totally new problem in an unfamiliar situation.’ Practice is most effective when it is intelligent practice, i.e. where the teacher is advised to avoid mechanical repetition and to create an appropriate path for practising the thinking process with increasing creativity. (Gu 2004) Mastery of the curriculum requires that all pupils:

  • use mathematical concepts, facts and procedures appropriately, flexibly and fluently;
  • recall key number facts with speed and accuracy and use them to calculate and work out unknown facts;
  • have sufficient depth of knowledge and understanding to reason and explain mathematical concepts and procedures and use them to solve a variety of problems.

A useful checklist for what to look out for when assessing a pupil’s understanding: A pupil really understands a mathematical concept, idea or technique if he or she can:

  • describe it in his or her own words;
  • represent it in a variety of ways (e.g. using concrete materials, pictures and symbols – the CPA approach)
  • explain it to someone else;
  • make up his or her own examples (and nonexamples) of it;
  • see connections between it and other facts or ideas;
  • recognise it in new situations and contexts;
  • make use of it in various ways, including in new situations.

Music

All children receive expert tuition from a peripatetic teacher. The children are encouraged to make music and to develop an appreciation of different types of music. Good use is made of the expertise of available professionals. Where appropriate children to take part in musical productions on a biannual basis. Children are provided with opportunities to a range of professional tuition of musical instruments.

Purpose of study Music is a universal language that embodies one of the highest forms of creativity. A high-quality music education should engage and inspire pupils to develop a love of music and their talent as musicians, and so increase their self-confidence, creativity and sense of achievement. As pupils progress, they should develop a critical engagement with music, allowing them to compose, and to listen with discrimination to the best in the musical canon.

Aims The national curriculum for music aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • perform, listen to, review and evaluate music across a range of historical periods, genres, styles and traditions, including the works of the great composers and musicians.
  • learn to sing and to use their voices, to create and compose music on their own and with others, have the opportunity to learn a musical instrument, use technology appropriately and have the opportunity to progress to the next level of musical excellence.
  • understand and explore how music is created, produced and communicated, including through the interrelated dimensions: pitch, duration, dynamics, tempo, timbre, texture, structure and appropriate musical notations.

Attainment targets By the end of each key stage, pupils are expected to know, apply and understand the matters, skills and processes specified in the relevant programme of study.

Key Stage 1: Pupils will be taught to:

Pupils should be taught to:

  • use their voices expressively and creatively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes.
  • play tuned and untuned instruments musically.
  • listen with concentration and understanding to a range of high-quality live and recorded music.
  • experiment with, create, select and combine sounds using the interrelated dimensions of music.

Key Stage 2: Pupils will be taught to:

Pupils should be taught to sing and play musically with increasing confidence and control. They should develop an understanding of musical composition, organising and manipulating ideas within musical structures and reproducing sounds from aural memory. Pupils should be taught to:

  • play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and playing musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression.
  • improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the interrelated dimensions of music.
  • listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with increasing aural memory
  • use and understand staff and other musical notations.
  • appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians.
  • develop an understanding of the history of music.

Physical Education

Overview: In physical education children develop their skills in gymnastics, dance, games and adventure play to develop good body co-ordination and control. This work is connected with our health programme. We endeavour to give each child enjoyment and satisfaction from physical activity and the opportunity to develop positive sporting attitudes. The children in our school carry out a minimum of 2 hours PE per week. We also promote swimming throughout the whole school on a weekly basis and provide opportunities to try netball and football. As a school we participate in many sporting competitions including football, netball, rounders, athletics, sports hall athletics and rugby. We believe in healthy competition teaching the children to do their best and be gracious in victory and defeat. Over the past few years we have been the champions in football and netball. The school also runs a wide variety of lunchtime and afterschool clubs, some of which are led by coaches from local teams, teachers and teaching assistants.

Purpose of study A high-quality physical education curriculum inspires all pupils to succeed and excel in competitive sport and other physically-demanding activities. It should provide opportunities for pupils to become physically confident in a way which supports their health and fitness. Opportunities to compete in sport and other activities build character and help to embed values such as fairness and respect.

Aims: The national curriculum for physical education aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • develop competence to excel in a broad range of physical activities
  • are physically active for sustained periods of time
  • engage in competitive sports and activities
  • lead healthy, active lives.

Attainment targets By the end of each key stage, pupils are expected to know, apply and understand the matters, skills and processes specified in the relevant programme of study.

Key Stage 1: Pupils will be taught to:

Pupils should develop fundamental movement skills, become increasingly competent and confident and access a broad range of opportunities to extend their agility, balance and coordination, individually and with others. They should be able to engage in competitive (both against self and against others) and co-operative physical activities, in a range of increasingly challenging situations. Pupils should be taught to:

  • master basic movements including running, jumping, throwing and catching, as well as developing balance, agility and co-ordination, and begin to apply these in a range of activities
  • participate in team games, developing simple tactics for attacking and defending
  • perform dances using simple movement patterns.

Key Stage 2: Pupils will be taught to:

Swimming and Water Safety: All schools must provide swimming instruction either in key stage 1 or key stage 2. In particular, pupils should be taught to:

  • swim competently, confidently and proficiently over a distance of at least 25 metres
  • use a range of strokes effectively [for example, front crawl, backstroke and breaststroke]
  • perform safe self-rescue in different water-based situations
  • All pupils in Years Two, Three and Four swim throughout the year. A £3 per week voluntary contribution to the costs is asked for these lessons.

Hit the Surf (RNLI): Hit the Surf is a half-day programme that gives the unique opportunity for children aged 8-11 to participate in an exciting lifesaving course. The course gives the student’s theory and practical water-based lessons on beach safety, surf survival skills and vital techniques for identifying hazards and dangers.

Religious Education

In Catholic schools, as in any school, Religion is taught as an academic subject: but this is not enough. The whole life of a Catholic School has to be an expression in practice of Catholic belief and Catholic tradition. Children are not only ‘taught’ their faith, it is ‘caught’ from home and from school. As they grow, the children are encouraged to put their faith into practice in their own lives. In class, the children help to prepare and participate in weekly liturgies and assemblies. Not only in the teaching, but also in the daily practice of the faith, our children are helped by the personal example of the staff. However great the opportunities given and examples set, they will have little lasting value without the support and encouragement of parents. We try hard in school, but we can only back up what you do at home. In handing on the faith, parents are the first and best teachers. No trouble, that a parent or teacher may take to become proficient in teaching the Catholic religion, is too great. By working together for the children; parents and teachers make this school a place which we can truly say: ‘When we welcome the child, we welcome the family’ Aims and objectives“.

  • To foster a love of God through knowledge and understanding of the Catholic Faith from scripture to doctrine.
  • To encourage the development of a personal relationship with God.
  • To help our children be aware of and respect other faiths.
  • To encourage children to study, investigate and reflect.
  • To develop the thinking and listening skills.
  • To develop respect for truth and for the view of others.

Home/School/Parish Partnership We believe that the school alone cannot undertake a child’s religious education. Religious Education begins at home at Baptism; the parents are the child’s first teachers and support the child with his/her first religious experiences. The school works in partnership with parents and parish to enrich the lives of our children. We distribute a weekly newsletter to inform parents about the weekly Gospel and notify parents of Masses and liturgies both in the school and the Parish. Our School regularly supports Parish events and fund raising e.g. CAFOD, SVP, Advent appeals, Lenten appeals.

Liturgy and Collective Worship Our Catholic faith is central to day to day life of our school and all aspects of the curriculum, and pupils are encouraged to recognise the importance of their faith and they respond to all forms of liturgy and collective worship with respect and reverence. We have a rich liturgical life in that the experiences we provide are wide ranging and take place in school, out of school, in Church and the wider community, and engage and involve pupils, parents, staff, governors and the parish. The Celebration of the Eucharist and prayer are central in our school. Our Parish Priest regularly celebrates Mass in School. In addition, we celebrate Whole School Masses at the beginning and end of term.

Statements to live by: The whole school gather weekly to listen and act upon a weekly statement to live by. Pupils participate in the assembly by reading the statement and thinking of ways they can follow it. The resource is rooted in nine guiding principles which support the distinctive nature of Catholic schools. The statements make the Catholic values of the school explicit, promote a positive and caring Christian ethos that is understood and communicated to everyone, promote emotional literacy and contribute towards community cohesion and the common good. They ensure that children and young people are given opportunities to:

  • Hear the Christian story and encounter the person of Jesus
  • Understand their uniqueness as made in the image and likeness of God
  • Experience a sense of belonging within a range of communities, including the local Eucharistic community
  • Know, appreciate and understand the importance of social justice
  • Know that our limitations are also opportunities for growth
  • Understand the connection between knowledge and living
  • Know that everything has the opportunity to reveal God’s presence to us, ie to see the divine in the ordinary
  • Forgive and be forgiven, to reconcile and be reconciled
  • Experience fun, humour, imagination, creativity, play and excitement in life

Each week a different statement such as ‘I try to be just and fair’ is displayed in every classroom and around the school, and introduced and explained to the children, usually through an assembly. Children are encouraged to think about the statement at the beginning of the school day, it is reinforced throughout the day, explored in collective worship and circle times (written specifically for each statement) and reflected upon before going home. Rewards are linked to the statements and certificates are presented to those children who have lived the statements well that week.

Sacramental Preparation The children prepared for the reception of the Sacraments of Reconciliation and Holy Communion on a two year rolling cycle. Children learn about the importance of the Sacraments through drama, storytelling, writing, singing and dancing. The children are supported in their preparation and celebration of the Sacrament by the school, parents and the parish. The children are also supported on their journey by the Multi-Academy Trust, and St Thomas More Catholic Secondary School in particular, who help prepare the children on their spiritual journey.

R.E. Programme We use ‘Come and See’: the Catholic Primary Religious Education programme for Foundation and Key Stages 1 and 2 published in July 2012. It makes learning about our faith lively, interactive and relevant. This easy to use, teacher-friendly material has been written by a group of experienced diocesan advisors. It follows on from successful trialling in schools in England and Wales and is based on the theological foundations of the Second Vatican Council, the Catholic Catechism and the revised RE Curriculum Directory and includes the Catholic attainment levels. The Catechism of the Catholic Church addresses the search for meaning in life. God’s initiative in Revelation who comes to meet us and our response of faith. (cf. CCC26) This pattern guides the structure of the programme and informs the process of each topic, opened up through; Explore, Reveal and Respond. The children also spend two weeks over the course of the year learning about other religions – one week each on Judaism and Islam. See below for a brief overview on what each class covers: Judaism:

Teaching and Learning in Religious Education: A range of teaching strategies and learning methodologies are employed depending on the needs and abilities of the children and the nature of the activities being undertaken. Work will be differentiated in terms of activity or outcome according to the needs and abilities of the children. Approaches will include whole class teaching, group activities and individual work. Children will have opportunities to work individually as well as co-operatively and collaboratively, developing their own knowledge and expertise as well as sharing their experiences with others. All work will involve thought provoking reflection and discussion, encouraging the children to develop their moral and spiritual consciences. Teachers are encouraged to make cross curricular links when planning R.E., incorporating opportunities for Speaking and Listening, Art and Design, ICT and extended writing where appropriate.

Withdrawal from R.E: The Governors are required to inform parents of their rights of withdrawal of pupils from religious education and worship. Parents are also reminded that our school exists to give a ‘Catholic’ education to its pupils. It is therefore expected that parents be in sympathy with the aims and objectives of the school.

Science

A high-quality science education provides the foundations for understanding the world through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics. Science has changed our lives and is vital to the world’s future prosperity, and all pupils should be taught essential aspects of the knowledge, methods, processes and uses of science. Through building up a body of key foundational knowledge and concepts, pupils should be encouraged to recognise the power of rational explanation and develop a sense of excitement and curiosity about natural phenomena. They should be encouraged to understand how science can be used to explain what is occurring, predict how things will behave, and analyse causes. 

Aims: The national curriculum for science aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Develop scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics
  • Develop understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science through different types of science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them
  • Are equipped with the scientific knowledge required to understand the uses and implications of science, today and for the future.

Scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding: The programmes of study describe a sequence of knowledge and concepts. While it is important that pupils make progress, it is also vitally important that they develop secure understanding of each key block of knowledge and concepts in order to progress to the next stage. Insecure, superficial understanding will not allow genuine progression: pupils may struggle at key points of transition (such as between primary and secondary school), build up serious misconceptions, and/or have significant difficulties in understanding higher-order content. Pupils should be able to describe associated processes and key characteristics in common language, but they should also be familiar with, and use, technical terminology accurately and precisely. They should build up an extended specialist vocabulary. They should also apply their mathematical knowledge to their understanding of science, including collecting, presenting and analysing data. The social and economic implications of science are important but, generally, they are taught most appropriately within the wider school curriculum: teachers will wish to use different contexts to maximise their pupils’ engagement with and motivation to study science. 

The nature, processes and methods of science ‘Working scientifically’ specifies the understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science for each year group. It should not be taught as a separate strand. The notes and guidance give examples of how ‘working scientifically’ might be embedded within the content of biology, chemistry and physics, focusing on the key features of scientific enquiry, so that pupils learn to use a variety of approaches to answer relevant scientific questions. These types of scientific enquiry should include: observing over time; pattern seeking; identifying, classifying and grouping; comparative and fair testing (controlled investigations); and researching using secondary sources. Pupils should seek answers to questions through collecting, analysing and presenting data. 

Spoken language The national curriculum for science reflects the importance of spoken language in pupils’ development across the whole curriculum – cognitively, socially and linguistically. The quality and variety of language that pupils hear and speak are key factors in developing their scientific vocabulary and articulating scientific concepts clearly and precisely. They must be assisted in making their thinking clear, both to themselves and others, and teachers should ensure that pupils build secure foundations by using discussion to probe and remedy their misconceptions.

Attainment targets By the end of each key stage, pupils are expected to know, apply and understand the matters, skills and processes specified in the relevant programme of study.

The Science Curriculum KS1: The principal focus of science teaching in key stage 1 is to enable pupils to experience and observe phenomena, looking more closely at the natural and humanly-constructed world around them. They should be encouraged to be curious and ask questions about what they notice. They should be helped to develop their understanding of scientific ideas by using different types of scientific enquiry to answer their own questions, including observing changes over a period of time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out simple comparative tests, and finding things out using secondary sources of information. They should begin to use simple scientific language to talk about what they have found out and communicate their ideas to a range of audiences in a variety of ways. Most of the learning about science should be done through the use of first-hand practical experiences, but there should also be some use of appropriate secondary sources, such as books, photographs and videos. ‘Working scientifically’ is described separately in the programme of study, but must always be taught through and clearly related to the teaching of substantive science content in the programme of study. Throughout the notes and guidance, examples show how scientific methods and skills might be linked to specific elements of the content. Pupils should read and spell scientific vocabulary at a level consistent with their increasing word reading and spelling knowledge at key stage 1.

Lower KS2 – Year 3 and Year 4: The principal focus of science teaching in lower key stage 2 is to enable pupils to broaden their scientific view of the world around them. They should do this through exploring, talking about, testing and developing ideas about everyday phenomena and the relationships between living things and familiar environments, and by beginning to develop their ideas about functions, relationships and interactions. They should ask their own questions about what they observe and make some decisions about which types of scientific enquiry are likely to be the best ways of answering them, including observing changes over time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out simple comparative and fair tests and finding things out using secondary sources of information. They should draw simple conclusions and use some scientific language, first, to talk about and, later, to write about what they have found out. ‘Working scientifically’ is described separately at the beginning of the programme of study, but must always be taught through and clearly related to substantive science content in the programme of study. Throughout the notes and guidance, examples show how scientific methods and skills might be linked to specific elements of the content. Pupils should read and spell scientific vocabulary.

Upper KS2 – Year 5 and Year 6: The principal focus of science teaching in upper key stage 2 is to enable pupils to develop a deeper understanding of a wide range of scientific ideas. They should do this through exploring and talking about their ideas; asking their own questions about scientific phenomena; and analysing functions, relationships and interactions more systematically. At upper key stage 2, they should encounter more abstract ideas and begin to recognise how these ideas help them to understand and predict how the world operates. They should also begin to recognise that scientific ideas change and develop over time. They should select the most appropriate ways to answer science questions using different types of scientific enquiry, including observing changes over different periods of time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out comparative and fair tests and finding things out using a wide range of secondary sources of information. Pupils should draw conclusions based on their data and observations, use evidence to justify their ideas, and use their scientific knowledge and understanding to explain their findings. ‘Working and thinking scientifically’ is described separately at the beginning of the programme of study, but must always be taught through and clearly related to substantive science content in the programme of study. Throughout the notes and guidance, examples show how scientific methods and skills might be linked to specific elements of the content. Pupils should read, spell and pronounce scientific vocabulary correctly.

SMSC, PSHE & RSE

In March 2017 the Bishops’ Conference produced a document called Learning to Love: An introduction to Catholic Relationship and Sex Education (RSE) for Catholic Educators. As a result of this the Diocese of Hexham and Newcastle has produced Relationships and Sex Education Guidance for Primary Schools. As a Catholic School we are duty bound to follow this guidance, Our policy links directly to the National Primary PSHE and RSE curriculum framework that cross references Personal Social Health Education and RSE.

At Sacred Heart, Personal Social and Health Education (PSHE) is an integral part of the school curriculum and is taught in a sensitive manner appropriate to the needs of the individual child. It aims to help children understand how they are developing personally and socially, tackling many of the moral, social and cultural issues that are part of growing up. It is intended to provide the children with the knowledge, understanding, skills and attitudes to make informed decisions about their lives whilst allowing them to explore feelings about themselves and others, and their place in the family and wider community. Topics covered include:

  • Friendships
  • Safety in school and out of school including internet safety
  • Dealing with emotions
  • People and their work
  • Keeping healthy
  • Anti-bullying

As a Catholic School it is important that we deliver a programme that relates to the teachings of the Catholic Church, that develops the essential skills required for self-understanding, an awareness of spirituality and one which places a high value on family life. We recognise that “Family” can be very different for different people and this must be treated with tolerance and respect. The DfE have recently reinforced the need “to create and enforce a clear and rigorous expectation on all schools to promote the fundamental British values.” As a result we have revised our PSHE scheme to include Promoting British Values. For more information click here. In 2015 ‘The Counter-Terrorism and Security Act’ was updated. The’ Prevent Duty’ is an aspect of this Act. The Prevent Duty is not about preventing students from having political and religious views and concerns but about supporting them to use those concerns or act on them in non-extremist ways. It covers such areas as:

  • Discussing different groups and communities
  • Respect equality and be a productive member of a diverse community
  • Respect and protect the environment.

In Years 5 and 6 PSHE programme of study is Sex and Relationship Education (SRE). We believe that values and attitudes come, first and foremost, from the home. The best place, therefore, for Sex and Relationship Education is in the context of a loving and caring family. It is not intended in any way to take away from parents the responsibility which they rightly have for helping their children to grow in knowledge of and respect for themselves and their own sexuality. Rather, the School sees itself and parents as partners in this most essential of tasks. In partnership with the NSPCC we deliver the underpants rule in Reception and Year 3 and their Child Line school service programme in Year 5 & 6. This reflects our emphasis on living true to the document “Keeping Children Safe in Education” (2016) Each of our junior year groups takes part in a residential trip each year, this builds on their personal skills and development. We aim to offer learning opportunities across and beyond the curriculum, in specific lessons as well as in assemblies, circle time, relevant school projects and other activities that enrich children’s experiences. We encourage children to grow into confident and emotionally secure individuals who know that the decisions they make will affect both themselves and others. Our overall aim is to provide children with essential life skills so that they leave us as well-rounded and confident individuals who are respectful and tolerant.

SMSC – Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural Development: Some assume spiritual development is just about religious exploration or faith, but this is not the case. The spiritual in SMSC is concerned with developing the non-material aspects of life, focusing on personal insight, values, meaning and purpose. Our Catholic belief helps provide perspective on life that helps with children’s spirituality. Creativity and imagination is important, as is a sense of fascination, awe and wonder.

At Sacred Heart we try to provide children with high quality learning opportunities, which along with our religious beliefs encourages children to be reflective and reach the highest possible achievements in all subjects. To this end the Arts including French, Music and Art have a prominent feature in our curriculum. The moral element is largely about choices, behaviour and how you live your life. It’s also about personal and societal values, understanding the reasons for them and airing and understanding disagreements. Sessions in class or assemblies, explore the consequences of decisions, other people’s needs, and ways of learning from experience.

We promote the strength of our positive relationships where adults act as good role models for the children. We also learn to listen to and respect the views and opinions of others. Social development shows pupils working together effectively, relating well to adults and participating in the local community. This element of SMSC includes a significant area of personal growth, ranging from engagement in school to the skills for successful personal relationships. Sacred Heart is built on the importance of relationships reflecting respect for self and one another. Cultural development is about understanding and feeling comfortable in a variety of cultures. We try to create opportunities for pupils to experience art, theatre and travel. We value and respect our cultural diversity and challenge racism and all forms of discrimination.

We are lucky in that Sacred Heart is culturally diverse so we can celebrate the diversity within our community. As our culture continues to change ‘The Prevent Duty’ was introduced. This is a duty on all schools and registered early years providers to have due regard to preventing people being drawn into terrorism. In order to protect children in our care, one must be alert to any reason for concern in the child’s life at home or elsewhere. This includes awareness of the expression of extremist views.

 Equality: The Equality Duty replaces the previous three sets of duties on schools to promote disability, gender and race equality through having equality polices and action plans for these groups.

Cookie Alert

We use cookies on this site to improve your user experience.

Search

Skip to content